Recently, I can’t but escape the feeling that a great portion of the high tech industry is taking crazy pills, as part of its morning diet. Seriously, if we are not taking crazy pills, you can’t explain the overload of Legacy Tech that is rapidly making a comeback – under a new name and flag. Yes, buzz-words were always a thing of this industry, but seriously, don’t you feel this is getting a little over-done lately?

What am I talking about? Well, let’s take a look at some recent buzz-words and go through them:

IoT – Internet of Things

If you lookup the term in Google, you will surely find the following on Wikipedia:

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the network of physical objects—devices, 
vehicles, buildings and other items—embedded with electronics, software, 
sensors, and network connectivity that enables these objects to collect 
and exchange data. The IoT allows objects to be sensed and controlled 
remotely across existing network infrastructure, creating opportunities 
for more direct integration of the physical world into computer-based 
systems, and resulting in improved efficiency, accuracy and economic 
benefit; when IoT is augmented with sensors and actuators, 
the technology becomes an instance of the more general class of 
cyber-physical systems, which also encompasses technologies such as smart 
grids, smart homes, intelligent transportation and smart cities. Each thing 
is uniquely identifiable through its embedded computing system but is able 
to interoperate within the existing Internet infrastructure. Experts estimate 
that the IoT will consist of almost 50 billion objects by 2020.
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Cool – isn’t it? Well, the Internet of Things existed far before the term was invented. It simply looked a little different. We had devices with SIM cards or devices with some other form of interaction technology – and we didn’t use IP, we used something else. But the minute it used IP, it got the name “Internet of Things”, simply due to the relation to the IP protocol. Almost 10 years ago, an Asterisk based plant irrigation project was shown on the web. Is that IoT? maybe not, but the overall result is similar. Actually, it is exactly the same, 10 years before IoT – but if you can’t see that it is the same, you are taking crazy pills.

Contextual/Task Oriented Chat Bots

Oh my god – when people showed me slack for the first time, I really didn’t understand why they are so excited about it. To me it looked mostly like a glorified mash-up between IRC, EggDrop and fancy Pseudo-Agile management system.

Chat bots that do stuff? really? In 2001 I worked at a company where I had to monitor and
control a set of servers, interconnected with 6 different SMS connections to various carriers. In order to get this stuff working and also get it working from my mobile phone, I used a combination of Nagios, Kannel, EggDrop and IRC. I used the IRC server as my command and control interface, EggDrop carried commands from the IRC server over to the Kannel Server and the Nagios servers, to run remote tasks and test various elements.

In 1999, I consulted a company that was called eNow (back then, ChatScan). They were scanning thousands of IRC channels to Internet trend analysis. Now, think about it, we scanned these IRC channels using EggDrop. Simple, TCL based, IRC Bots that would roam the IRC networks in search of interesting things.

If you are wondering what EggDrop is, check out: http://www.eggheads.org/

Over Virtualising

Can someone please explain me the following scenario: You lease a cloud based, small foot print server from any of the cloud companies, you then run Docker it and create additional virtual machines on the VM instance.

Dude, might as well just have your own server with Proxmox, KVM or some other virtualisation container. I just don’t get it, the fact that you can do something, doesn’t always mean that this is what it is meant for.

The following video just shows this is the funniest way ever:

 

 

 

Confession – I’m what you would call a Hyper Connected person. I’m constantly connected to my Note 4 mobile phone, I check my mail on a regular basis at least once an hour, my phone constantly beeps with Instant messages and information being delivered directly to my device.

Professional tend to describe Hyper Connectivity as a state called FOMO – Fear Of Missing Out. According to wikipedia, FOMO is:

Fear of missing out or FoMO is “a pervasive apprehension that others might be having rewarding experiences from which one is absent”.[2] This social angst [3] is characterized by “a desire to stay continually connected with what others are doing”.[2] FoMO is also defined as a fear of regret,[4] which may lead to a compulsive concern that one might miss an opportunity for social interaction, a novel experience, profitable investment or other satisfying event.[2] In other words, FoMO perpetuates the fear of having made the wrong decision on how to spend time, as “you can imagine how things could be different”.[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear_of_missing_out

Now, Hyper Connectivity has its associated costs to your life – You are constantly at anybody’s reach, if you are sometimes out of reach – people take it as being rude and eventually, it starts hitting your health and productivity.

So, about 2 weeks ago, I started my own little social experiment – and I decided that everybody on my contact list should be part of this experiment. I’ve done the almost obscene thing to do, I’ve turned my mobile device notifications off. No more SMS beeping, WhatsAPP groups are now muted, e-Mail no longer beeps like crazy.

Initially, for the first two days, I thought I was going mad. My phone was quite, suddenly, I was fully capable of doing the work and having the life I wanted. I was able to concentrate on my tasks, apart from a phone call here and there, I was fully capable of actually getting stuff done – without being interrupted every 15 minutes. Can you imagine living your life in 15 minute intervals? that was the story of my life for the past 5  years.

One of the amazing results of this experiment was that the feeling of “rudeness” was purely in my head only. When people sent me an email, or a text, and I didn’t respond within 30 seconds, or even 30 minutes, people acknowledged as: “ok, he’s probably busy and will return the minute he can”. That had two very interesting impacts: first, when I did reply, I spent enough time thinking about what was asked from me, and I was able to respond in a highly comprehensive manner. The second one was, and that was the shocking bit, I was conversing less by email and text, as things became clearer.

Imagine this, I “communicate less” and “converse more” – amazing!

It also made me realise something else – really productive people aren’t hyper connected, they are hyper engaged. The are fully engaged with what they do, not with the means of communications. The engage their tasks in a dedicated manner, able to focus completely on one task – and getting it done the right way. I also noticed that some of the people on my contact list, the highly successful ones, actually take a fairly lengthy time to respond – not because the are rude – it is because they are respectful. They respect themselves by allowing themselves the time to focus, and they respect their colleagues by focusing on their requirements in a devoted and centred manner.

If like me, you are Hyper Connected, I urge you to try and disconnect for a bit – it will change your world and perspective on how to get things done.

Developers! We are the modern day artists, the masters of the keyboard and the sculptors of algorithms and ideas. We turn obscure thought and imagination into real life creations, capable of doing things previously not done (well, at least not in the same form). As such, we are individuals and unique – each one of us in our own way. Whether we develop a mobile app or a web application, our unique style, way of thought, organization and coding style will be reflected into our creation – we can’t help it, this is who we are.

About 2 years ago I’ve done a project for a start-up company in Israel, where I developed a full blown switching environment for them. I worked on that project for around 9 months and how shall I put it, my name was all over the place. Normally, when I take a piece of code from the OpenSource/PublicDomain, I will document where it came from within the code – then I will add a simple remark next to my modifications.

So, the other day I met one of the new developers working on the project – who didn’t know I was the original developer. And he told me about some issue that he was having with his project – so, in a very natural way, I pointed out to him that the original code wasn’t meant to work like that, specifically, he should into a specific function to resolve the issue and add some additional code to make it work as he wanted. The guy was shocked – “What the hell? are you psychic or something? how can you know that?” – I replied – “Well, I wrote the damn code, I should know”, which followed by me showing him the original source code on my computer. The guy said: “Yes, that is the source code, but all the remarks of the original source code are gone”. Seems that following my departure from the project, someone went into great length in order to remove the various comments I’ve put into the code, to make its origins as unclear as possible.

So, on one hand, I truly understood it – after all, the guy running the show doesn’t want the new people to call up the previous developers and exposing new stuff to them – even if by mistake. On the other hand – Dude, are you really that lame? are you really the afraid that your team will know who wrote the original code?. Source code is a living organism, it is an unique as the person who wrote it and will evolve and change as more people write more code. The Asterisk project still contains remarks that Mark Spencer put back in 2002 – and they are no longer relevant to the existing code, but only to an obscure part of the original code – but it’s still there.

So, to sum up, I never remove remarks that other people wrote from my code – it’s rude, it’s bad practice and worst of all – it’s ugly and disrespectful. Developer will join and leave a project, show your minimal level of respect by respecting their code and their remarks, leave them where they are – removing them is just like performing an act of murder.

It is a fairly rare occasion when one gets to meet one’s childhood (or to be more accurate, teen) hero. For me, growing up as a teenage computer geek in Israel, during the late 80’s, early 90’s, the electronic world was a bold new frontier of opportunities and challenges. I distinctively remember the original myths that were spread around the teenage geeks – there is a box, called a “blue-box”, it’s a box of wonders – enabling you to bypass the local PTT systems and call abroad for FREE. It was the early 90’s, long distance phone calls were expensive, beyond expensive – they were outrageous. Calling abroad was even worse, it could easily amount to $2-$3 per minute, doing it the normal way. The “blue-box” for us was a myth, a box of wonders that no one never get around to actually seeing one.

Then, late 1989 something happened, a friend of mine returned from the US with, what I could only call a magazine – back then it was called a zine. I can’t call it a magazine, as it was a group of dot-matrix printed pages, stapled together. My friend said: “This is a hacker’s magazine, but I can’t understand the blue-box thing”. My eyes lit, could it be, did the pages truly include description of what the blue-box was? I looked at it and replied: “Of course you don’t understand this, you are a computer science major – not electronics”. I studies electronics and the blue box made sense to me. The pages included the entire circuit diagram – I was fascinated. I built the my first “blue-box” using those diagrams, it was crude, it wasn’t pretty, but it worked – well, it worked for exactly 15 minutes, then the power regulator I used kind’a fried. That was my beginning in the world of Hacking and Computer security.

Following to reading about/building my first “blue-box”, I continued to consume information. I used the box, each time for short intervals and each time getting to download more information. I remember being connected to the Channel One BBS in the US, downloading the hacker’s chronicle and reading through like mad. I learned about the works of a man nick named: “Captain Crunch”. His work in investigating the various properties of the telephone network amazed me – at that age, for me, he was a modern day Robin Hod. Fighting the system, from within the system – showing how frail it is, and abusing it to the max. I must say something here, unlike the USA at those time, we didn’t have anti-hacker laws in Israel, thus, computer crime was so rare, they didn’t even know what to do with hackers – if they ever managed to catch them.

Fast forward 25 years, I’ll be 40 next month. Over the years I’ve learned that Captain Crunch is the alias of John Draper. I’ve met John first time in 2000, in a hackers’ convention in Israel called Y2Hack. I didn’t get to chat with him much back then, it was a busy event. This years’ Astricon was in Las Vegas, where John currently lives. After learning about John’s medical condition, I’ve decided I would like to pay the man a visit. Normally, you don’t get around to meeting people who had influenced your life in such a deep manner, but here I had a chance. So, Eric and I contacted John – who was more than happy to join us for dinner.

It is clear that John is not at his best, in severe pain from his latest surgery – and most surely medicated for his pain. However, sitting down with him for dinner, one thing is very much clear – when it comes to technology, John is as sharp as ever. The conversation rapidly moved from talking about history, to talking about modern day cellular technologies, how roaming works, phantom base stations, HTML5, WebRTC and more. At times, it would seem that the conversation would float away, but John rapidly closes in on the subject – and being in his physical condition, that isn’t simple (I guess).

John, very much like other visionaries that hadn’t been completely acknowledged by society – sorry to say, is far from what we would imagine him to be at this age. Normally, we imagine that people like John would be living a good life, after all, the computer age was very much built on much of his work and findings. But, the truth is that John’s friends started a qikfunder campaign to fund hi medical bills. Amazingly enough, John isn’t a rich man at all. For someone who was acclaimed as “If it hadn’t been for the blue box, there would have been no apple” (Steve Jobs, 1994) – it is somewhat discomforting to see him like this.

I truly wish John all the best and wish him a speedy recovery – as his mind is as sharp as ever, and I truly hope to see him back at the tech-helm as soon as he can.

A Nokia E90 (open).

Image via Wikipedia

For those who had been reading this blog for some time now, you may have stumbled across my blog post from 2008, regarding me buying a Nokia E90 – http://www.simionovich.com/2008/06/06/i-finally-purchased-a-nokia-e90.

Well, it’s a fact, since the year 1998, I’ve been an avid Nokia fan. I think I’ve ranged from the old Nokia 51XX, through the 6XXX up to the E61, E62 and E90 – if it was some funky Nokia phone that gave me some new feature, I most probably had it. I guess that the time I spent at m-Wise, working closely with various mobile content technologies had put its toll on me – and I became a Nokia Cell Phone addict. For many years I couldn’t imagine myself digressing from the Nokia clan. Even when my friends moved from their Nokia/Motorola/Ericsson phones to a star spangled iPhone – I remained faithful to my old habits – and remained with my trusty Nokia.

Nokia 5800 XpressMusic showing Wikipedia's mai...

Image via Wikipedia

About two years ago I promised myself this: “If you ever decide to move to a touch screen phone, don’t go ala iPhone, stay for a Nokia phone” – so I waited. The initial Nokia touch phones came out. The first Nokia touch phone that came out, I believe shortly after the iPhone was the Nokia 5800, also known as the Nokia XpressMusic.

I’ve got one thing to say about this phone – “What the hell were you thinking???” – it’s a phone, not a bloody MP3 player – if I wanted an MP3 player, I would have bought an iPod. Apart from being the slowest phones I’ve ever encountered, its touch interface was annoying and disruptive.

So, I didn’t buy the Nokia 5800 – I simply had no use for it. At that point I decided to wait a bit more, and see what Nokia cooks up. Shortly after seeing the 5800 in dis-action, I met a new member of the Nokia clan: the Nokia 700.

The Nokia 700 was a totally new thing, not really a phone, not really a PDA – somewhat of a cross between the two. It was big and bulky, and I couldn’t imagine myself walking around with one of these – however, it showed some promise. Sure, it was big, bulky, slow and anything bad you can say about a device – however, it had one thing – it showed potential – something to look for. At that time, I decided that I needed a proper smart phone and purchased the Nokia E90 – and I was fairly happy with it till 8 months ago.

You are probably asking, why would an avid Nokia fan become displeased with his trusty E90 phone – the answer is simple – the plastics. The plastics are of such low quality, that after 18 months of usage, the paint job starts to peel away from the phone. As you run more and more applications, or store more data, the phone becomes sluggish and slow – to the point where you have to reset it.

So, 2 months ago I gave up, I said to myself: “that’s it, time to move forward and leave the Nokia clan” – but I still didn’t want to put myself with the iPhone clan – or to be more exact, the iPhone cult movement. While at the Amoocon convention, I came across some people who were using HTC phones, specifically the HTC Evo. Well, I was somewhat taken with this snazy piece of hardware. It was fast, it was fluid and for some funky reason, I felt at home with it. Could it be, have I found a new clan for my mobile needs? I returned back home starting to examine my options. The HTC Evo isn’t available in Israel, the next best thing is the HTC Desire.

The HTC Desire is also known as the Google Nexus-1, basically it’s the same phone. I tried using the Nexus-1, but I didn’t like it. Specifically, I didn’t like the fact that the four keys are touch based – on the HTC these are real keys, making my life much easier.

So now, I’m equipped with the HTC Desire, and apart from the occasional Android crash (not too often to be honest) – it is one of the best phones I ever had. It’s fast, syncs my life into a manageable construct and most importantly, it’s become a second nature to me. The only disadvantage of owning such a phone is that you need a massive Data plan with your carrier – this little machine can gobble up ten’s of megabytes on a daily basis. My old Nokia E90 was using 25MB of data per month, with the Desire, I consume that much in less than a day – that is an amazing number.

In order to get better into Android development, I’ve ordered an Eken M002 device. This is a 7″, Android based tablet PC. I’ll be posting information about that once it arrives.

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