The box is a lie!

The box! What is the box? is it the teaching and constructs we’ve been taught over the years? the sum of experience and know-how? the various community or industry constraints and rules put upon us to conform? – Regardless what the box may be, everybody always tells us to “Think outside of the box”.

However, is “Thinking outside of the box” real? or is it something else? I personally believe the first element, and also the crucial part of that phrase is “Thinking”. Most people are not truly accustomed to thinking, they are mostly accustomed to “doing”, “following”, “leading” – not “thinking”. So, what am I ranting about exactly?

As a technology innovator I don’t believe the box is really there, a problem is a challenge to be resolved – it is not a box. As you can’t confine a problem/challenge to a box, it is an amorphous entity – my thinking patterns can’t be “outside of the box, simple because there is no BOX! The box is only in our mind – forcing ourselves to “Out of box” thinking is actually putting ourselves back into the confines of the box.

Solving complex challenges requires thinking first, then innovation and delivery. While thinking is something most people take for granted, as they believe they do it all the time, it’s actually a fairly complex process. Thinking involves one very special thing – that is letting go. Letting go of your own inhibitions, letting go of your own fear – and foremost, the willingness to step out of your normal comfort zone and looking at problems from a fresh new angle.

Over the course of time, I’ve been involved with multiple ventures that required this type of thinking. Some were successful, some had failed miserably – and some had went up in flames, that left the earth around its remains mostly scorched – with friends now not willing to talk to one another. Why have these companies failed? why have they gone to ashes? most of them actually had very innovative products and ideas, it can’t be that they truly went up in flames – or was actually something else that causes its demise?

Again, we come back to the box – and the realisation that the box, isn’t really a box – it’s an IKEA set of honeycombs, stacked together into a highly complex array of shelves, that are barely viable to the naked eye – but to the keen observer, will present multiple opportunities and possibilities.

Companies, regardless of their industry, are normally built of the same operational units:
1. Management
2. Marketing
3. Sales
4. Operations
5. Human Resources
6. Research and Development
7. Manufacturing

Now, normally – we would expect “out-of-box” thinking from R&D, Marketing and Sales. However, these will always be limited to the ability of Management and Operations to think “out-of-box”. If company management is limited by its thinking – that will automatically affect all operational units in the company – which will eventually bring to its slow and gruesome demise.

Another reason for untimely demise is the inability to respect the so called “Box”. It may be that you are willing to let go of the box, you are willing to say: “The box isn’t real”, but, it may be that your target market or audience is still kept in the “Box”. In such a case, taking your audience out of the “Box” is a highly challenging task – where most pioneers will fail. Why will it fail? it takes a very special individual to be able to do that. Not only he needs to be a true visionary, he needs to be able to convince other people of his belief. And most importantly, it can’t be some random hired person – it has to be a founder, a true believe of the cause, a person so capable of immersing himself in the idea – that it becomes an integral part of his being, anything else will just not work.

It takes a true genius to take an audience and shift their minds from the box, very few had succeeded. Look around you? how many people do you know of who are capable of doing that? Personally speaking, I can list a few, but counting will require less than my right hand. Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Stephen Hawking – these are all pioneers who had challenged the “box” and managed to educate the audience that the “box” isn’t really there. Was Steve Jobs a technology genius? – NO. Is Elon Musk a master electrical engineer, most probably not. They are thought leaders, mind shapers – they are the ones will look at and say: “He’s a smart guy, maybe I should listen to him”, and it’s not really because they are smart. It’s because they were able to convince us, with their own conviction and determination, that they should be listened to.

Dr. Who once said: “I’m just a mad man in a box” (Yes, I’m a moderate whovian), that is further from the truth. The tardis is always “bigger on the inside”, and thus, the “Box” isn’t limited to own physical borders, and anything always “out-of-box”.

So, next time you encounter a problem, try challanging yourself by saying: “Ok, let’s think about this from a new point of view, maybe there is another solution”. Next time when you interview someone for a position at your company, try to say: “Ok, is this guy truly what my team needs? or do I need something else?” – look at the box, shatter it to pieces and build something new from it – out of chaos comes order – out of rubble comes greatness.

Telephony Fraud – Further Analysis

Following yesterday’s post, I’ve decided to take another set of data – this time following the start of the year, with a specific data profile. What is the profile? I will describe:

  1. The honeypot server in this case was a publically accessible Kamailio server
  2. The honeypot changed its location and IP every 48 hours, over a period of 2 weeks
  3. The honeypot was always located in the same Amazon AWS region – in this case N.California
  4. All calls were replied to with a 200 OK, followed by a playback from an Asterisk server

In this specific case, I wasn’t really interested in the attempted numbers, I was more interested to figure out where attacks are coming from. The results were fairly surprising:

The above table shows a list of attacking IP numbers, the number of attempts from each IP number – and the origin country. For some weird reason, 97% of potential attacks originated in Western Europe. In past years, most of the attempts were located in Eastern European countries and the Far-East, but now this is Mainland Europe (Germany, France, Great Britain).

Can we extrapolate from it a viable security recommendation? absolutely not, it doesn’t mean anything specific – but it could mean one of the following:

  1. The number of hijacked PBX systems in mainland Europe is growing?
  2. The number of hijacked Generic services in mainland Europe is growing?
  3. European VoIP PBX integrators are doing a lousy job at securing their PBX systems?
  4. European VPS providers pay less attention to security matters?

If you pay attention to the attempts originating in France, you would notice a highly similar IP range – down right to the final Class-C network, that is no coincidence, that is negligence.

Now, let’s dig deeper into France and see where they are attempting to dial:

So, on the face of it, these guys are trying to call the US. I wonder what are these numbers for?

Ok, that’s verizon… let’s dig deeper…

Global Crossing? that is interesting… What else is in there???

 

So, all these attempts go to Landlines – which means, these attempts are being dialed most probably into another hijacked system – in order to validate success of finding a newly hijacked system.

Well, if you can give me a different explanation – I’m all open for it. Also, if any of the above carriers are reading this, I suggest you investigate these numbers.

 

 

We are all probably taking crazy pills!

Recently, I can’t but escape the feeling that a great portion of the high tech industry is taking crazy pills, as part of its morning diet. Seriously, if we are not taking crazy pills, you can’t explain the overload of Legacy Tech that is rapidly making a comeback – under a new name and flag. Yes, buzz-words were always a thing of this industry, but seriously, don’t you feel this is getting a little over-done lately?

What am I talking about? Well, let’s take a look at some recent buzz-words and go through them:

IoT – Internet of Things

If you lookup the term in Google, you will surely find the following on Wikipedia:

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the network of physical objects—devices, 
vehicles, buildings and other items—embedded with electronics, software, 
sensors, and network connectivity that enables these objects to collect 
and exchange data. The IoT allows objects to be sensed and controlled 
remotely across existing network infrastructure, creating opportunities 
for more direct integration of the physical world into computer-based 
systems, and resulting in improved efficiency, accuracy and economic 
benefit; when IoT is augmented with sensors and actuators, 
the technology becomes an instance of the more general class of 
cyber-physical systems, which also encompasses technologies such as smart 
grids, smart homes, intelligent transportation and smart cities. Each thing 
is uniquely identifiable through its embedded computing system but is able 
to interoperate within the existing Internet infrastructure. Experts estimate 
that the IoT will consist of almost 50 billion objects by 2020.
<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference"></sup>

Cool – isn’t it? Well, the Internet of Things existed far before the term was invented. It simply looked a little different. We had devices with SIM cards or devices with some other form of interaction technology – and we didn’t use IP, we used something else. But the minute it used IP, it got the name “Internet of Things”, simply due to the relation to the IP protocol. Almost 10 years ago, an Asterisk based plant irrigation project was shown on the web. Is that IoT? maybe not, but the overall result is similar. Actually, it is exactly the same, 10 years before IoT – but if you can’t see that it is the same, you are taking crazy pills.

Contextual/Task Oriented Chat Bots

Oh my god – when people showed me slack for the first time, I really didn’t understand why they are so excited about it. To me it looked mostly like a glorified mash-up between IRC, EggDrop and fancy Pseudo-Agile management system.

Chat bots that do stuff? really? In 2001 I worked at a company where I had to monitor and
control a set of servers, interconnected with 6 different SMS connections to various carriers. In order to get this stuff working and also get it working from my mobile phone, I used a combination of Nagios, Kannel, EggDrop and IRC. I used the IRC server as my command and control interface, EggDrop carried commands from the IRC server over to the Kannel Server and the Nagios servers, to run remote tasks and test various elements.

In 1999, I consulted a company that was called eNow (back then, ChatScan). They were scanning thousands of IRC channels to Internet trend analysis. Now, think about it, we scanned these IRC channels using EggDrop. Simple, TCL based, IRC Bots that would roam the IRC networks in search of interesting things.

If you are wondering what EggDrop is, check out: http://www.eggheads.org/

Over Virtualising

Can someone please explain me the following scenario: You lease a cloud based, small foot print server from any of the cloud companies, you then run Docker it and create additional virtual machines on the VM instance.

Dude, might as well just have your own server with Proxmox, KVM or some other virtualisation container. I just don’t get it, the fact that you can do something, doesn’t always mean that this is what it is meant for.

The following video just shows this is the funniest way ever:

 

 

 

Hyper Engagement – Enabled!

So, it has now been 2 months, since I started my own little social experiment. Early November, I decided to silence down all my mobile device notifications and mute any “distracting interaction” I could find. No, I didn’t silence off my mobile phone completely – it will just make it useless, but I didn’t make it as less intrusive as possible.

So, about 3 weeks ago I decided that it’s high time, to put my trusty Lenovo X1 Carbon Touch to its final resting place. I was contemplating what notebook should I get. My gut feeling told me: “Time for another Lenovo”. But, somewhere in the back of my head was this ever annoying question: “Is a Mac truly better?”. So, in a spur of the moment, I decided to buy a Mac. Because I am what you would define as a power user, I decided to get the most bang out of eace one of my spent dollars.

So, now I’m closing a month with my Mac and combined with my “Hyper – Not!” regime, I started a fairly lengthy road of re-getting used to using a Mac. Have to admit, El-Crapitan has its quirks. Who am I kidding, compared to previous versions, El-Crapitan is somewhat annoying. However, after getting used to its little quirks and kinks, when you combine the Good of the Mac and “Hyper -Not!” – I managed to reach at least a 40% increase in my productivity.

Time that used to be spent on waiting for things to launch properly and setting up on my Lenovo, just cut by almost 70%. Issues of the machine halting on me or requiring a reboot – gone. Issues that required me to go into Task Manager and seek a process to kill – gone!

In other words, I spend far less time on BS and more time on actual work that needs to be done. Previously, I was able to focus on 2 projects – tops. Today, I’m able to focus on 5 different projects and be involved with 2 more. Is it purely to moving to a Mac? I doubt it. Is it purely related to my “Hyper – Not!” regime, i doubt it as well. It must be a combination of the two. How long will I be able to keep this up? donno, I’ll keep you all updated on my findings.

 

Where will Asterisk be in your future?

A dear friend, the CEO of fone.do, Mr. Moshe Meir had written a blog post on the fone.do blog. The title is: “Is there a future for Asterisk?

I have a different take on the thing. I think that Moshe is simply asking the wrong question. He should be asking “What is the role of Asterisk in your future?”.

I know Moshe personally, and I’m shocked by the short sighting of his question. Asterisk was born, initially as a PBX – it has evolved to much more than that. Last year, in my presentation, I showed a slide of a large elephant, with various blind people feeling it around – trying to ascertain what an elephant is. Asterisk is that elephant, it will be what you want it to be. You want it to be a PBX, so be it. You want it to be a Video gateway, so be it. You want it to be a services control point for your OTT application, so be it. You decide!

As technologists and visionaries, it is our job to look ahead into the future and think: “What is the next step? where will we be in 5 years from now, in 7 years from now?” – that is called visionary, pioneering, disrupting and most importantly, exceptional. You want to know what the future of Asterisk will be? look at what you need, that is where it will go. Was always the case, and will always be the case.

Yes, I use Kamailio, OpenSIPS, FreeSwitch and other tools. Yes, I’ve used OpenRTC, EasyRTC, Kurento and others. Yes, we still use them and YES – WE USE ASTERISK, and we will most probably keep using Asterisk for our needs – where it fits the best and assumes the task to the best of its ability. This is why every year we come to Astricon, this is why every year we join the DevCon, this is why every year we make it our business to keep track of whats going on in the core. Moshe, you are forgetting, we are not drivers, we are mechanics – we build and fix things. Tony Stark in Iron Man 3 says: “I’m a mechanic” later on the child replies “You’re a mechanic, fix it” – here’s my challenge to you – “FIX IT!” – make it better, make it stronger, make it into the thing you love and want.

One more thing Moshe, and this is something for you to think about – when you write a blog post, on a blog that has no way of allowing its readers to comment or participate in any form, you should not write opinion posts. Opinions are meant for people who can interact and respond.

** EDIT: You can comment to this post via facebook, at: http://on.fb.me/1QQQ18Q