So, it has now been 2 months, since I started my own little social experiment. Early November, I decided to silence down all my mobile device notifications and mute any “distracting interaction” I could find. No, I didn’t silence off my mobile phone completely – it will just make it useless, but I didn’t make it as less intrusive as possible.

So, about 3 weeks ago I decided that it’s high time, to put my trusty Lenovo X1 Carbon Touch to its final resting place. I was contemplating what notebook should I get. My gut feeling told me: “Time for another Lenovo”. But, somewhere in the back of my head was this ever annoying question: “Is a Mac truly better?”. So, in a spur of the moment, I decided to buy a Mac. Because I am what you would define as a power user, I decided to get the most bang out of eace one of my spent dollars.

So, now I’m closing a month with my Mac and combined with my “Hyper – Not!” regime, I started a fairly lengthy road of re-getting used to using a Mac. Have to admit, El-Crapitan has its quirks. Who am I kidding, compared to previous versions, El-Crapitan is somewhat annoying. However, after getting used to its little quirks and kinks, when you combine the Good of the Mac and “Hyper -Not!” – I managed to reach at least a 40% increase in my productivity.

Time that used to be spent on waiting for things to launch properly and setting up on my Lenovo, just cut by almost 70%. Issues of the machine halting on me or requiring a reboot – gone. Issues that required me to go into Task Manager and seek a process to kill – gone!

In other words, I spend far less time on BS and more time on actual work that needs to be done. Previously, I was able to focus on 2 projects – tops. Today, I’m able to focus on 5 different projects and be involved with 2 more. Is it purely to moving to a Mac? I doubt it. Is it purely related to my “Hyper – Not!” regime, i doubt it as well. It must be a combination of the two. How long will I be able to keep this up? donno, I’ll keep you all updated on my findings.


Confession – I’m what you would call a Hyper Connected person. I’m constantly connected to my Note 4 mobile phone, I check my mail on a regular basis at least once an hour, my phone constantly beeps with Instant messages and information being delivered directly to my device.

Professional tend to describe Hyper Connectivity as a state called FOMO – Fear Of Missing Out. According to wikipedia, FOMO is:

Fear of missing out or FoMO is “a pervasive apprehension that others might be having rewarding experiences from which one is absent”.[2] This social angst [3] is characterized by “a desire to stay continually connected with what others are doing”.[2] FoMO is also defined as a fear of regret,[4] which may lead to a compulsive concern that one might miss an opportunity for social interaction, a novel experience, profitable investment or other satisfying event.[2] In other words, FoMO perpetuates the fear of having made the wrong decision on how to spend time, as “you can imagine how things could be different”.[4]

Now, Hyper Connectivity has its associated costs to your life – You are constantly at anybody’s reach, if you are sometimes out of reach – people take it as being rude and eventually, it starts hitting your health and productivity.

So, about 2 weeks ago, I started my own little social experiment – and I decided that everybody on my contact list should be part of this experiment. I’ve done the almost obscene thing to do, I’ve turned my mobile device notifications off. No more SMS beeping, WhatsAPP groups are now muted, e-Mail no longer beeps like crazy.

Initially, for the first two days, I thought I was going mad. My phone was quite, suddenly, I was fully capable of doing the work and having the life I wanted. I was able to concentrate on my tasks, apart from a phone call here and there, I was fully capable of actually getting stuff done – without being interrupted every 15 minutes. Can you imagine living your life in 15 minute intervals? that was the story of my life for the past 5  years.

One of the amazing results of this experiment was that the feeling of “rudeness” was purely in my head only. When people sent me an email, or a text, and I didn’t respond within 30 seconds, or even 30 minutes, people acknowledged as: “ok, he’s probably busy and will return the minute he can”. That had two very interesting impacts: first, when I did reply, I spent enough time thinking about what was asked from me, and I was able to respond in a highly comprehensive manner. The second one was, and that was the shocking bit, I was conversing less by email and text, as things became clearer.

Imagine this, I “communicate less” and “converse more” – amazing!

It also made me realise something else – really productive people aren’t hyper connected, they are hyper engaged. The are fully engaged with what they do, not with the means of communications. The engage their tasks in a dedicated manner, able to focus completely on one task – and getting it done the right way. I also noticed that some of the people on my contact list, the highly successful ones, actually take a fairly lengthy time to respond – not because the are rude – it is because they are respectful. They respect themselves by allowing themselves the time to focus, and they respect their colleagues by focusing on their requirements in a devoted and centred manner.

If like me, you are Hyper Connected, I urge you to try and disconnect for a bit – it will change your world and perspective on how to get things done.

Astricon 2015 is now over, honestly, it flew passed us really fast – at least for me it did. I will refrain from talking about the location of it – as it is more of less a geek’s paradise when it comes to movies and amusement parks. But putting that aside, let’s talk about Astricon itself.

As I see it, Astricon 2015 had distinctively two shining stars – from what I managed to collect. The first one is WebRTC, as it was definitely the talk of the corridors and within the DevCon. Be it a WebRTC controller Lego Puppy, or a connected Tooth Brush – WebRTC is definitely an exciting thing. With the growing popularity of among developers and its inherent connection to Asterisk – I’m confident we’re going to hear more about Respoke in the coming year.

The second one, that is naturally closer to me, is ARI. I’ve seen several people do some really innovative stuff with ARI – and more specifically, PHPARI. I was surprised to learn of a content provider in the Philippines who is using PHPARI to drive over 1500 concurrent calls, topping a total of 5 Million minutes a month – using Asterisk 13 and PHPARI. Man, what a rush! – I started PHPARI about two years ago, I personally know of thousands of installations, but till today, no one really told me what kind of mileage they were getting from it. But learning that someone is packing a 1500 concurrent calls punch with PHPARI, I was ecstatic.

Then, slightly after learning that, I participated a panel with Matt Jordan and Gaston Draque – where we discussed the status of ARI and people had the chance to ask questions. Gaston came to me after the panel saying: “You know, we had a serious fight in the company if to use PHPARI or use GO programming language”. According to Gaston, currently, PHPARI is the most complete toolkit for ARI development – man what a rush. Gaston really knows what he’s doing, I’ve seen some of his work in the past – getting this from Gaston is a serious compliment.

When my wife learned that Astricon this year will be in Orlando, she said: “Take a day off and go have some fun”. So, initially, I was supposed to fly with Eric Klein only. However, we ended up 4 of us in Orlando – which was way more fun. So, for the last day and under the excellent orchestration of Eric, a trip to the Kennedy Space Center was arranged. A group of 21 Telephony geeks got on the bus and took a trip to the Kennedy Space center. Honestly, a highly motivating and inspiring place. Think about it, NASA sent people to the moon, with computer power that is far inferior to your everyday smart phone – simply amazing.


The trip lasted the entire day – we left the hotel at around 8:30, only to come back to the hotel at around 20:30 – a full day! Honestly, if you are going to Orlando, schedule a day trip to KSC – just to see the Apollo rocket in real life – your jaw will drop!

We finished the day back at the hotel, where the first lady of Asterisk joined us for dinner at Jake’s – which was an evening filled with laughter and jokes all around.


So, what’s next? I guess I need to start putting my ass to the chair and cranking up the speed on adding new features to PHPARI .Btw, if you want to help, I will would highly appreciate it – it a work of love, but sharing it around is even better.

A dear friend, the CEO of, Mr. Moshe Meir had written a blog post on the blog. The title is: “Is there a future for Asterisk?

I have a different take on the thing. I think that Moshe is simply asking the wrong question. He should be asking “What is the role of Asterisk in your future?”.

I know Moshe personally, and I’m shocked by the short sighting of his question. Asterisk was born, initially as a PBX – it has evolved to much more than that. Last year, in my presentation, I showed a slide of a large elephant, with various blind people feeling it around – trying to ascertain what an elephant is. Asterisk is that elephant, it will be what you want it to be. You want it to be a PBX, so be it. You want it to be a Video gateway, so be it. You want it to be a services control point for your OTT application, so be it. You decide!

As technologists and visionaries, it is our job to look ahead into the future and think: “What is the next step? where will we be in 5 years from now, in 7 years from now?” – that is called visionary, pioneering, disrupting and most importantly, exceptional. You want to know what the future of Asterisk will be? look at what you need, that is where it will go. Was always the case, and will always be the case.

Yes, I use Kamailio, OpenSIPS, FreeSwitch and other tools. Yes, I’ve used OpenRTC, EasyRTC, Kurento and others. Yes, we still use them and YES – WE USE ASTERISK, and we will most probably keep using Asterisk for our needs – where it fits the best and assumes the task to the best of its ability. This is why every year we come to Astricon, this is why every year we join the DevCon, this is why every year we make it our business to keep track of whats going on in the core. Moshe, you are forgetting, we are not drivers, we are mechanics – we build and fix things. Tony Stark in Iron Man 3 says: “I’m a mechanic” later on the child replies “You’re a mechanic, fix it” – here’s my challenge to you – “FIX IT!” – make it better, make it stronger, make it into the thing you love and want.

One more thing Moshe, and this is something for you to think about – when you write a blog post, on a blog that has no way of allowing its readers to comment or participate in any form, you should not write opinion posts. Opinions are meant for people who can interact and respond.

** EDIT: You can comment to this post via facebook, at:

In a recent blog post by Tsahi Levent-Levi (Aka: bloggeek), he rants about the usage of plugins and various other pieces of software to enable web based video conferencing. And I say – HE’S GOT IT ABSOLUTELY RIGHT!

Why do we really need anything other than WebRTC for video conferencing? why do I need 4 different plugins for WebEx and other bullshit tools on the net?

I suggest that you read his post – he’s got it smack on the dot –